uovodaraviolo9

Uovo da Raviolo (a.k.a. Runny Yolk Ravioli) with Sage Brown Butter

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uovodaraviolo9

You know how I feel about runny yolks. #eggslut

I finally got my KitchenAid Pasta roller attachment and decided to break her in with this ravioli recipe. Like, what else can I say? It’s a runny yolk inside of homemade pasta… I mean.. just. HERE.

For the pasta: flour, eggs, olive oil, Martha Bourdain (my KitchenAid) and her new homie the Pasta Roller (name pending, suggestions in the comments appreciated)

For the pasta: flour, eggs, olive oil, Martha Bourdain (my KitchenAid) and her new homie the Pasta Roller (name pending, suggestions in the comments appreciated)

Flour and eggs go into the mixer with a dough hook. Mix until the dough pulls away from the sides and forms a ball. You can also do this part by hand by mounding the flour, creating a well in the middle, cracking the eggs into that well and combining in the flour slowly with your fingers.

Flour and eggs go into the mixer with a dough hook. Mix until the dough pulls away from the sides and forms a ball. You can also do this part by hand by mounding the flour, creating a well in the middle, cracking the eggs into that well and combining in the flour slowly with your fingers.

Knead. Knead. Knead. Top pic is right out of the mixer, middle pic is after 5 minutes of kneading, last picture is after 10 minutes. My shoulders hurt, but look how baby-butt smooth my pasta looks! All gluten-y and elastic-y.

Knead. Knead. Knead. Top pic is right out of the mixer, middle pic is after 5 minutes of kneading, last picture is after 10 minutes. My shoulders hurt, but look how baby-butt smooth my pasta looks! All gluten-y and elastic-y.

 

After letting the dough rest, pass through the pasta roller, starting at the widest setting and decreasing wideness with each pass, until you get to "6" on your roller attachment.

After letting the dough rest, pass through the pasta roller, starting at the widest setting and decreasing wideness with each pass, until you get to “6” on your roller attachment.

Look how thin she is! Nothing tastes as good as thin feels... probably not what Kate Moss was referring to, but it's what I'M TAUMBOUT. Holla.

Look how thin she is! What’s the saying… Nothing tastes as good as thin feels… probably not what Kate Moss was referring to, but it’s what I’M TAUMBOUT. Holla.

A random tangent about truffle salt: Look. Truffles are expensive y'all. EXPENSIVE. I don't have truffle money so I go with tasty affordable alternatives, like this delicious truffle salt. A little goes a long way and definitely imparts a lovely truffle-y taste and aroma. I'm obsessed. It makes everything taste fancy I won't tell you how I sprinkle truffle salt on my Lean Cuisines. I'll keep that to myself.

A random tangent about truffle salt: Look. Truffles are expensive y’all. EXPENSIVE. I don’t have truffle money so I go with tasty affordable alternatives, like this delicious truffle salt. A little goes a long way and definitely imparts a lovely truffle-y taste and aroma. I’m obsessed. It makes everything taste fancy
I won’t tell you how I sprinkle truffle salt on my Lean Cuisines. I’ll keep that to myself.

for the ravioli filling

Combine spinach, ricotta and parmesan. Season to taste with salt, pepper and nutmeg. And maybe a sprinkle sprinkle of truffle salt, too.

Combine spinach, ricotta and parmesan. Season to taste with salt, pepper and nutmeg. And maybe a sprinkle sprinkle of truffle salt, too.

Yes, I realize that using a YELLOW CUTTING BOARD was the wrong answer. Unfortunately, I didn't realize until too late. You'll deal. Anyway - place one square of ravioli down and add a  mound of the spinach ricotta filling.

Yes, I realize that using a YELLOW CUTTING BOARD to make these ravioli was the wrong answer. Unfortunately, I didn’t realize until too late. You’ll deal. Anyway – place one square of ravioli down and add a mound of the spinach ricotta filling.

Create a little well in the spinach mixture with the back of a spoon. After cracking your egg into a small bowl, carefully place the yolk into the mound with a little bit of additional egg white.

Create a little well in the spinach mixture with the back of a spoon. After cracking your egg into a small bowl, carefully place the yolk into the mound with a little bit of additional egg white. I sprinkled a little truffle salt on top of the yolk. Boop!

Brush the edges of the bottom sheet of pasta with egg wash and cover with an additional sheet of pasta. (BTW, wonton wrappers work well for this recipe if you don't feel like making your own dough.) Work from the filling toward the outside to get out any air bubbles, and press edges to seal completely.

Brush the edges of the bottom sheet of pasta with egg wash and cover with an additional sheet of pasta. (BTW, wonton wrappers work well for this recipe if you don’t feel like making your own dough.) Work from the filling toward the outside to get out any air bubbles, and press edges to seal completely.

sage and brown butter

Get your sage and brown butter together while you boil the ravioli, it only takes a couple minutes for them to cook, since the pasta is fresh and we want that egg yolk runnnaaaaay.

brown butter sage ravioli

After boiling for a couple of minutes, GENTLY place the ravioli in the pan of browned butter and sage. Toss her around until she’s coated in browned butter sage-y deliciousness.

ravioli

Plate each ravioli, top with brown butter and a little bit of that fried sage. NOMS.

 

I mean... just look at that. It's like built in sauce. #eggslut

I mean… just look at that. It’s like built in sauce. #eggslut

 

Uovo da Raviolo with Sage Brown Butter

adapted from Mario Batali
makes 6 large ravioli

Ingredients
for pasta dough

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
4 eggs
2 tablespoons olive oil

for ravioli
1/2 cup Parmigiano-Reggiano, grated, plus more for garnishing pasta
1/2 cup fresh sheep’s milk ricotta
1/2 cup spinach, blanched, drained and chopped
Scant pinch nutmeg
Salt and white pepper to taste
Truffle salt (optional)
7 very fresh eggs
12 tablespoons butter, melted and kept warm
5-10 sage leaves

Directions

for the pasta

In an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook, combine flour and salt. Add eggs 1 at a time and continue to mix. Drizzle in oil and continue to incorporate all the flour until it forms a ball. Sprinkle some flour on work surface, knead the dough until elastic and smooth. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and let it rest for about 30 minutes to allow the gluten to relax.Cut the ball of dough in half, cover and reserve the dough you are not immediately using to prevent it from drying out. Dust the counter and dough with flour. Form the dough into a rectangle and roll it through the pasta machine, 2 or 3 times, at its widest setting. Guide the sheet of dough with the palm of your hand as it emerges from the rollers. *Reduce the setting and crank the dough through again, 2 or 3 times. Continue until the machine is at its narrowest setting. The dough should be paper-thin, about 1/8-inch thick.

for the ravioli

In a non-reactive bowl combine the Parmigiano, ricotta and spinach. Mix well and season to taste with nutmeg, salt and white pepper. Set aside.

From the thin pasta sheet, cut 12 squares at about 6 inches wide. Set 6 of the squares on a sheet tray dusted with flour, cover with plastic wrap and set aside.In the center of each of the remaining 6 squares, mound an equal portion of the ricotta mixture. With the back of a small ladle or spoon, hollow out a well in the center of each mound. Carefully break the eggs, 1 at a time, into a small bowl, and transfer 1 yolk and a bit of white into the center of each well. It is imperative that the yolk remain unbroken. Sprinkle each yolk with a bit of truffle salt.

Brush the edges of the pasta squares with egg wash. Cover each filled square of pasta with an unfilled square, and press from the center toward the outside of the pasta to eliminate any air bubbles between the pasta sheets. Press edges with fingers to seal.

Right before cooking the ravioli, brown remaining butter in a large saute pan and keep warm. Don’t let it burn!
Bring 6 quarts of water to a boil and add 2 tablespoons salt. Gently, using a wide spatula, lower each ravioli into the water to cook for 2 minutes. Remove from the water and place gently into a 12 to14-inch saute pan with the browned butter and sage. Add a generous grating of Parmigiano-Reggiano and carefully put 1 on each plate.

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