pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

Pancit Molo (Filipino Pork Dumpling Soup)

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pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

Traditionally, pancit refers to “noodles” in Filipino cuisine, so I’m not entirely sure why this soup is called Pancit Molo since it doesn’t have any noodles. However, if you have any leftover wonton wrappers, slice those up into strips and throw them in the broth. Ta-da! Noodles!

Basically, if your Filipino grandmother made wonton soup, I imagine this is how it would taste.  I used my dear friend Jamie’s method of making chicken stock extra chicken-y and delicious without spending an entire day doing it – simmer bone-in chicken with store-bought chicken stock, seasonings and additional water for a couple hours. I don’t make chicken stock often, so when I need to do it, I double the recipe. It’s always nice to have (semi) homemade chicken stock on hand for soups and sauces.

No time for stock option: skip the extraly delicious broth part and just use a couple boxes of stock and go from there.

Vegetarian option:  use vegetable broth as a base, skip the fish sauce and replace the ground pork and shrimp in the dumpling with sauteed and chopped mushrooms.

These dumplings freeze VERY well. This recipe is enough to make about 50-60 total, so if you don’t plan on feeding 10 people at once, you’ll probably freeze the rest. Once you have them all folded, place in a single layer on a parchment-lined baking sheet and freeze until solid; it should only take a couple hours. Place in an airtight freezer bag and they’ll keep for a month. When you’re ready to enjoy, plop them in some boiling broth. Easy peasy leftover dinnertimes, especially if you doubled the stock recipe, then you already have it on hand!

Let’s start with the stock.

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

You’ll need chicken stock, salt, pepper, bone-in chicken pieces (I used legs), garlic, onion and bay leaves.

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

In a large stockpot, add stock, bay leaves, garlic, onions, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and add in chicken pieces.

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

As the broth simmers, skim off any impurities that float to the top. Let simmer for about 2 hours. The chicken should be ridiculously tender.

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

After a couple hours, remove the chicken and let cool enough to handle. Remove skin and bones and shred the chicken meat. Set aide.

While the broth is simmering, you can start on the dumplings. It took me about 30 minutes to fold 55.

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

You’ll need onion, ground pork, sesame oil, wonton wrappers, an egg, garlic, shrimp and green onions.

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

Finely chop the green onions, garlic, white onion and shrimp. Combine with the ground pork, sesame oil and salt and pepper.
PLEASE, take the time to fry up a little patty of the dumpling filling to check for seasoning. You CANNOT season the filling once it’s in the wrapper. Save yourself the “not enough salt and pepper” heartache. Totes worth the 2 minutes it takes and yay for a snack while cooking!

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

To fold the dumplings:
1) Place 1/2 tbsp of filling in the center of the wrapper.
2) Wet the perimeter of the wrapper with water.
3) Join opposite corners of the wrapper, sealing the edges.
4) Make sure you push out any air bubbles around the filling before completely sealing.
5) Fold one side over the center, using water to seal in place.
6) Fold over the corner of the wrapper to overlap the other edge, like the dumpling is giving itself a delicious, tiny hug!

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

Alternately, if folding dumplings isn’t your thing, you can create a little “purse” by sealing the edges together at the top of the dumpling. I prefer the folding version illustrated above – there’s less of a chance of the filling leaking.

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

If you don’t plan on serving 10 people, you’ll have pleeeenty of dumplings leftover. They freeze great! Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet and freeze in a single layer, with no dumplings touching, until frozen solid – about 2 hours. Place in an airtight freezer bag and it’ll keep for a month.

Now, put all this hard, tedious work together!

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

Patis gives the broth it’s distinct flavor. This is a Filipino fish sauce. If you can’t find it, use the fish sauce you can find.

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

In a medium pot, add shredded chicken and 1 tbsp of patis. Saute for a few minutes. Ladle in broth, about 7-8 cups. It should be enough broth so the dumplings can simmer and be completely covered by liquid. Bring the stock to a boil.

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

Once the stock is boiling, add in the dumplings. I don’t recommend dropping them in like this, because HOT SPLASHING LIQUID… but how awesome is this picture lol

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

Cook for 6-8 minutes. Once they’re done, they’ll float up to the top.

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

Juicy, deliciously plump dumplings!

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

I serve it just like this – but feel free to serve over rice… it would probably even be good with quinoa! Garnish with additional green onion.

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

I could probably eat a million of these…

pancit molo - filipino pork dumpling soup on fmitk.com

because, delicious.

Pancit Molo (Filipino Dumpling Soup)

adapted from @giantpandaheart’s grandpa’s Miki recipe
makes ~50-60 dumplings (8-10 servings) in about 3 hours (2 hours inactive cooking time for the broth)

Ingredients

for the broth
1 quart organic chicken stock
2 bay leaves
1 medium or half a large onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, peeled
1 tsp salt
1 tsp whole black peppercorns
1lb chicken, bone in (I used leg quarters)
water
1 tbsp fish sauce (Patis), or more to taste

for the dumplings
1lb ground pork
1/2lb shrimp, shelled, deveined and minced
1/2 cup green onion, finely chopped
1 tsp sesame oil
1/2 cup onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 egg
1/4 tsp salt (or more to taste)
freshly ground pepper, to taste

~60 wonton wrappers

to garnish
chopped green onions
fried garlic

Directions

for the broth

In a large stockpot, place chicken stock, bay leaves, diced onion, garlic, salt and whole peppercorns and bring to a boil. Add in chicken pieces and additional water (enough to cover the chicken, about 4 cups) and simmer over medium-low for 2 hours. Skim off any impurities that come to the surface. The broth should be rich in flavor, but not salty – the salt will come from the addition of fish sauce (patis) later.

Remove the chicken from the stock. Once cool enough to handle, remove skin and bones and shred chicken meat. Set aside.

for the dumplings

In a medium bowl, combine the ground pork, minced shrimp, green onion, sesame oil, white onion, garlic, egg, salt and pepper.  Take the time to fry up a small patty of the mixture to check for seasoning – you can’t season once the filling is inside the wrapper. Do yourself a favor and try it out before you start filling the dumplings. Adjust seasonings as needed.

To fold the dumplings, place 1/2 tbsp of filling in the center of the wrapper. Wet the perimeter of the wrapper with your finger. Join opposite corners of the wrapper together to form a triangle. Carefully seal the edges together, making sure you’re pushing out any air bubbles around the filling. With the top of the triangle pointed away from you, fold the left and right sides over each other, using a little water to seal the edges. It should look like the dumpling is giving itself a nice, tight hug. Repeat.

assembly

In a medium or large pot, place shredded chicken and add 1 tbsp of fish sauce (patis) and saute over medium high heat for a couple of minutes. Add 7-8 cups of stock to the pot and bring to a boil. Add in dumplings, no more than about 15 at a time, and cook about 6-8 minutes. They’ll float to the top once they’re done. Cook in batches as needed.

Serve this as is, garnished with green onions and fried garlic, or serve over white rice for a more filling meal.

 

Pancit Molo (FIlipino Pork Dumpling Soup)
Pancit Molo (FIlipino Pork Dumpling Soup)
by
Pancit Molo (FIlipino Pork Dumpling Soup) with shredded chicken and green onions.

Prep Time:45 minutes

Cook Time:2 hours, 20 minutes

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18 replies
  1. sundiegoeats
    sundiegoeats says:

    I love wonton soup and love this! How would you say this tastes different from regular wonton soup? I am so intrigued. Also love the picture of the little dumpling cliff diving into the soup broth, hot water splashing be damned (I am sure you took the necessary precautions) 😉

    Reply
    • holly
      holly says:

      Really, the only difference between “regular” wonton soup and this is the addition of shredded chicken and the patis. Patis has a flavor allll its own… definitely different from a Thai or Vietnamese fish sauce.

      Reply
  2. Christina
    Christina says:

    My best guess is that “pancit” means noodles the same way “fun” means noodles in Chinese. It doesn’t literally mean noodles, but refers more to the dough, which can be used to make wrappers or noodles.

    Reply
  3. Rosemary
    Rosemary says:

    Yet another hit with my family! I love your recipes! I used a mix of prawn and chicken mince, and it was delicious!

    Reply
  4. Lory
    Lory says:

    I saved the link to this recipe a while back and I finally got around to making it last night. Alot of steps in making this recipe, but the effort was worth it. I doubled the dumpling recipe and made lots of them for later. It took a while to get used to wrapping dumplings, but I really had my technique down by the second batch. My family enjoyed the soup!

    Reply
  5. Resa
    Resa says:

    It feels nice to read a post on the net about this humble soup. My mother taught me how to make this soup as she came from the place where this recipe originated. Another variant is to add a little milk to the soup. Sometimes we add anatto powder while sauteing to add a little color. And yes, we used chicken (for my Adventist father), chicken with shrimp, beef with pork and even fish for the filling!

    Reply
  6. Noxy
    Noxy says:

    I made this recipe for my fiancé’s birthday last year (he’s from that area!) as a surprise!

    I’m white (Irish/German /& a bit Native American) hehehe…

    My sweet fiancé actually cried and said it was perfection! Not just because of the awesome recipe, but he said no one had ever really thought to do anything like that for him ever in his life. 🙂

    Reply
  7. Madeline
    Madeline says:

    My lola used to make pancit molo, and this reminds me of her and her cooking! Thank you for posting this. When I google won ton soup it is usually the Chinese version, but as my mom’s side is Filipino, I want to try and stick to my roots when making it : ) I’m hoping to try this this weekend!

    Reply

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  1. […] This is a Step by Step Preparation for Pancit Molo Recipe I saw on another food Blog. Credit to the original owner of this picture […]

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