Smoked Jerk Chicken Wings (and a DIY Stovetop Smoker!)

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This DIY smoker uses Reynolds Wrap to keep flavors at an all-time high.

Posted by Allrecipes on Monday, July 10, 2017

If you love smoked meats, but have an impossibly tiny kitchen and no yard space like yours truly, try this DIY stovetop smoker! Smoked chicken wings might be one of my favorite snacky foods ever, and they’re definitely a hit anytime I bring them to a party. Try it out!

 

Smoked Jerk Chicken Wings
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 3 lbs
Ingredients
  • 1.5 oz Jerk Seasoning (Walkerwood or Grace brand)
  • 2 tbsp malt vinegar, more to taste
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 bunch green onions, chopped
  • 3 springs fresh thyme
  • 2 springs fresh rosemary
  • 1/2 tbsp sea salt
  • 1/2 tbsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 lbs chicken wings, split at the joint
  • 3 tbsp wood pimento wood chips (can substitute hickory or mesquite)
Instructions
  1. Combine jerk seasoning, malt vinegar, onion, green onions, salt and pepper. Taste marinade and adjust seasonings as needed. Marinate wings at least overnight.
  2. Prepare a large roasting pan by lining completely with heavy-duty foil (for easy clean-up!), then placing 3 tbsp of wood chips in the center, directly over the heat source.
  3. Place drip-tray over wood chips, if using, or fashion one out of a piece of heavy-duty aluminum foil.
  4. Place a rack in the roasting pan and place wings on rack.
  5. Cover the pan tightly with foil, leaving one corner open. Turn the heat up to high. Once you see a bit of smoke coming out of the open corner, seal the foil completely and turn the heat down to medium-low. You may have to adjust the heat as needed to keep the wood chips smoldering. You should see a bit of smoke coming out here and there, and that’s just fine.
  6. Cook for 20-25 minutes, or until the thickest part of a drummette reaches 170F.

 

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2 replies
  1. Ani {@afotogirl}
    Ani {@afotogirl} says:

    Holly, do you soak the wood chips first or use them dry? I’ve never used wood chips before so I have no clue. Also, do you need to have something to catch the drippings or do you just let the drippings fall into the chips to create steam?

    Reply

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